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Tender Grassfed Barbecue: Traditional, Primal and Paleo by Stanley A. Fishman
By Stanley A. Fishman
Link to Tender Grassfed Meat at Amazon
By Stanley A. Fishman



I am an attorney and an author, not a doctor. This website is intended to provide information about grassfed meat, what it is, its benefits, and how to cook it. I will also describe my own experiences from time to time. The information on this website is being provided for educational purposes. Any statements about the possible health benefits provided by any foods or diet have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

I do receive some compensation each time a copy of my book is purchased. I receive a very small amount of compensation each time somebody purchases a book from Amazon through the links on this site, as I am a member of the Amazon affiliate program.

—Stanley A. Fishman, author of Tender Grassfed Meat


Frugal, Delicious Hungarian Hash

By Stanley A. Fishman, author of Tender Grassfed Meat

Ingredients for Hungarian Hash Recipe: leftover grass-fed meat, bacon, organic potatoes, pastured eggs, organic onions, and Hungarian paprika.

Ingredients: grassfed meat, bacon, potatoes, eggs, onions, and paprika.

What to do with leftovers is often an issue. The very word “leftovers” is unattractive. However, leftovers can be the foundation of some absolutely wonderful and frugal dishes. Meat was so valuable and scarce in traditional Europe that it could never be wasted. The Europeans developed many traditional dishes based on leftover meat, usually adding many ingredients to stretch the meat. This recipe is based on this European tradition, and is very tasty and nourishing.

The word “hash” comes from the word “hache,” which means “to chop” in French. There are many variations, from Sweden, Denmark, Germany, England, and other countries. All of the recipes include meat, potatoes, onions, eggs, and plenty of fat. I have tried many of these versions with grassfed meat leftovers, and they were all good. But my very favorite is this one, which I based on the traditional Hungarian flavor combination of bacon, onions, and paprika. I continue the European tradition of cooking potatoes with plenty of fat. This dish is so good that there is nothing “leftover” about it. In fact, when my family eats this dish, nothing is left over.

Serves 4

1 to 2 cups of leftover grassfed meat (beef, bison, or lamb, or any mixture of the three), cut into small cubes, approximately ½ inch

1 large or 2 medium organic onions, sliced

4 medium organic potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 inch cubes.

6 slices natural uncured fat bacon

1 teaspoon paprika, organic or imported from Europe, preferably Hungary

4 eggs, preferably pastured

  1. Place the slices of bacon next to each other in a cold 12 inch frying pan, preferably cast iron. Put the pan on the stove, turn the heat to medium, and cook the bacon, turning as necessary, until most of the fat has been rendered from the bacon. The bacon should be fairly crisp at this point. Remove the bacon from the pan and reserve, leaving the rendered fat in the pan.
  2. Add the sliced onions, and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes. Add the paprika and stir it into the onions. Continue cooking for another 4 minutes.
  3. Add the potatoes, and cook for another 5 minutes, stirring and turning the potato cubes.
  4. Turn the heat to low, cover the pan, and cook for another 5 minutes.
  5. Add the meat, and stir until the meat is browned, 3 to 4 minutes.
  6. Crumble the reserved bacon and stir into the dish.
  7. Carefully break the eggs over the hash, and cook just until the yolks set.

Serve and enjoy this very nutritious meal.

This post is part of Real Food Wednesday at Kelly the Kitchen Kop.

This post is part of Pennywise Platter at the Nourishing Gourmet.

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