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Tender Grassfed Barbecue: Traditional, Primal and Paleo by Stanley A. Fishman
By Stanley A. Fishman
Link to Tender Grassfed Meat at Amazon
By Stanley A. Fishman



I am an attorney and an author, not a doctor. This website is intended to provide information about grassfed meat, what it is, its benefits, and how to cook it. I will also describe my own experiences from time to time. The information on this website is being provided for educational purposes. Any statements about the possible health benefits provided by any foods or diet have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

I do receive some compensation each time a copy of my book is purchased. I receive a very small amount of compensation each time somebody purchases a book from Amazon through the links on this site, as I am a member of the Amazon affiliate program.

—Stanley A. Fishman, author of Tender Grassfed Meat


Hungarian Potato Dish Is Great for Hot Weather

By Stanley A. Fishman, author of Tender Grassfed Meat

Organic potatoes fried with Hungarian flavors

Potatoes with Hungarian Flavors

It is often hard to choose which recipe to put into a book. I had developed two recipes for Hungarian-style potatoes, but there was room for only one. Another version of this recipe will be in my new book, which will be finished soon. But this version is so good I decided to post it so my readers can enjoy it.

This recipe is based on the traditional Hungarian flavor combination of onions, paprika, and bacon fat. This simple combination results in a rich, sweet, savory flavor that is a joy to taste. This dish is cooked at low heat on top of the stove, which makes it a good choice for a side dish on a hot day. Actually, it tastes so good that it can be enjoyed in any weather.

The basic Hungarian flavor base is made by sautéing onions in bacon fat until lightly colored, lowering the heat, and adding paprika. Very simple, but care must be taken in the selection of ingredients.

I recommend using organic potatoes and organic onions for this dish, as they have a better flavor.

The paprika should be from Hungary, if possible, and should be sweet. However, you could, if necessary, make it with sweet paprika (dulce) from Spain, or organic paprika.

I also recommend using bacon that does not contain nitrates, or other artificial preservatives, preferably from pastured pigs. The bacon absolutely must be very fat, as plenty of bacon fat is necessary for the success of this recipe.

Like many traditional recipes, this dish is simple, but the flavor is over the top, being much more than the sum of its parts.


Filtered water for boiling

1 teaspoon coarse unrefined sea salt

6 medium organic potatoes, peeled, and quartered lengthwise

4 thick slices fat bacon, without nitrates

2 medium organic yellow onions, sliced

1 tablespoon organic or imported sweet paprika, preferably Hungarian


1.      Heat a medium-sized pan of filtered water to boiling. Add the salt and the potatoes, and bring it back to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium, and let the potatoes cook at a slow boil for 10 minutes. Drain the potatoes.

2.      Place the bacon in a cold heavy-bottomed frying pan. Turn the heat to medium. When the fat starts to melt, lower the heat to medium low. Turn the bacon from time to time so the fat can render from both sides without burning.

3.      When most of the fat has rendered from the bacon, add the onions and sauté over medium low heat for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. The onions should soften and take on a golden color.

4.      Turn the heat down to low. Add the paprika and mix well into the onions. Cook over low heat for 2 minutes, stirring, being careful not to burn the paprika.

5.      Add the potatoes and stir well, making sure that all the potatoes are coated by the fat and paprika. Use a heavy spoon to break each potato quarter into two or three pieces as you stir.

6.      Turn the heat back up to medium and stir. Cook for another 5 minutes, turning the mixture occasionally.

7.      Cover the pan, and turn the heat to low. Cook for another 10 minutes, lifting the lid and stirring occasionally.

You should wind up with a meltingly soft, caramelized mélange of onions and potatoes, subtly flavored by the paprika that goes well with any barbecued meat.

This post is part of Weekend Gourmet, Real Food Wednesday and Fight Back Friday blog carnivals.

  1. Monday Morning Mix-Up 7/4/2011 - Kelly the Kitchen Kop posted on April 24, 2015:

    […] like I am, you’ll want to not look over this mouth-watering recipe from Stan Fishman:  Hungarian potatoes. Although it does have plenty of super-nutritious animal fats, so even if you are watching carbs, […]

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